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Ayureda From Slumber II



Ayurveda is a system of alternative medicine with roots in India.

In countries beyond India, Ayurvedic therapies and practices have been integrated in other general wellness applications. - The main Ayurveda texts begin with accounts of the transmission of medical knowledge from the Gods to


sages, and then to human physicians. An Ayurvedic diet is an eating plan that provides guidelines for when you eat, what you eat, and how you eat to boost your health, prevent or manage disease, and maintain wellness. If you follow an Ayurvedic diet, you'll eat primarily whole or minimally processed foods and practice mindful eating rituals.


The diet is based on Indian Ayurvedic wellness systems that date back thousands of years. Some studies have shown that Ayurvedic lifestyle practices—including the diet—can help improve your health. But following an Ayurvedic diet for weight loss isn't necessarily a proven method to lose weight.


If you follow an Ayurvedic diet, you'll incorporate many different practices into your eating routine. These practices help you to benefit from the different qualities of food.

One of the primary characteristics of an Ayurvedic diet is that you eat according to your dominant constitutional type or dosha. You can think of your dosha as your most prominent energy. There are three different Ayurvedic doshas that derive from five different elements: space, air, fire, water, and earth. Each element provides different qualities or attributes.


Vata (space and air): Vatas are often described as creative, intense, or expressive. Attributes include dry, light, cold, and rough.Pitta (fire and water): Pittas are often described as intelligent, joyful, and driven. Attributes include sharp, hot, liquid, and mobile.Kapha (earth and water): Kaphas are often described as calm, loving, or lethargic. Attributes include moist, heavy, soft, and static.


Basic Ayurvedic eating practices include: Intake of six rasas or tastes. At each meal, you will incorporate foods that are sweet, salty, sour, bitter, pungent and astringent. You begin your meal with foods that have a sweet taste (like sweet fruit), then consume food that is salty (such as seafood) and sour (citrus fruit, for example), then finish with foods that are pungent (like onions or peppers), astringent (such as green apples or tea), and bitter (celery, kale, or green leafy vegetables). Eat mindfully and with concentration. Avoid talking, laughter, and other distractions to fully appreciate your meal and the wholesome benefits it provides.Eat slowly enough that you can savor the taste of the food.Eat quickly enough to prevent the food from getting cold.Eat the proper quantity of food. Be aware of signs of fullness to avoid overeating.Eat only when your previous meal has been digested. Guidelines suggest that you do not eat within three hours of your previous meal or snack and you should not go without food for more than six hours. Many Ayurvedic practitioners also recommend that you eat a modest breakfast and a larger, satisfying lunch. Dinner may or may not be consumed based on your hunger levels.

Slumber I & II

Music Sleep Aid - by Earnest Woodall Slumber is precision-engineered music layered with natural soundscapes, that open the flow of calming feelings. Envision cleansing showers before your mind’s eye as you find yourself transported on smooth, silky waves of sound.